Samsung
Case Study

This is a non-verified sample short-form report based on cursory analysis of data that was not collected by GameBench Labs or in accordance with GameBench Labs’ testing methodology.

It is intended for illustrative purposes only, to show how GameBench Labs can provide game studio’s with actionable intelligence about the graphical performance of their products.

GameBench Pro

Methodology

Although we did not collect the test data and so cannot be sure that all necessary variables were controlled across tests, we did use our standard methodology for analysis within the GameBench dashboard.

This involves, for example, using the Chart Selection feature to highlight gameplay sections only, ignoring menus and load screens. It also means we only recorded minimum frame rates that occured while gameplay animation was onscreen (including animation that took place behind an in-game prompt or pop-up).

Introduction

GameBench Labs is the service side of GameBench Ltd, offering:

  • Data collection, using crowd data from users of the free version of GameBench, plus hired testers in a range of markets who have been trained to use GameBench tools in combination with a strict game-testing methodology;
  • Product ratings, based on GameBench’s industry-recognised system for objectively grading gaming experiences, useful for a top-level summary of results, competitor analysis, internal KPI-setting and external marketing;
  • Performance analysis, including competitor analysis and highlighting likely bottlenecks and optimisation issues;

Details

We’ve worked closely with Samsung to share actionable intelligence that helps game performance problems to be fixed.

For example, GameBench revealed that the Exynos-based Galaxy S7 Edge had a bug that caused Unity-based games to run at 15fps. The bug was located in a Mali display driver specifically for the curved Edge screen, and this was fixed via an OTA update.

GameBench also recently revealed a bug in the game NBA 2K18, which was causing cloth simulation effects to bottleneck the CPU and cause serious frame rate drops that hurt player competitiveness. It turned out that the game studio (2K Games) had not properly implemented the NEON extension for certain chipsets.